Please Log In.



 
HomeCalendarFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : 1, 2  Next
AuthorMessage
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:01 pm

The Monkey's Paw
"Be careful what you wish for, you may receive it." -- Anonymous
Part I

Without, the night was cold and wet, but in the small parlour of Laburnum villa the blinds were drawn and the fire burned brightly. Father and son were at chess; the former, who posessed ideas about the game involving radical chances, putting his king into such sharp and unnecessary perils that it even provoked comment from the white-haired old lady knitting placidly by the fire.

"Hark at the wind," said Mr. White, who, having seen a fatal mistake after it was too late, was amiably desirous of preventing his son from seeing it.

"I'm listening," said the latter grimly surveying the board as he streched out his hand. "Check."

"I should hardly think that he's come tonight, " said his father, with his hand poised over the board.

"Mate," replied the son.

"That's the worst of living so far out," balled Mr. White with sudden and unlooked-for violence; "Of all the beastly, slushy, out of the way places to live in, this is the worst. Path's a bog, and the road's a torrent. I don't know what people are thinking about. I suppose because only two houses in the road are let, they think it doesn't matter."

"Never mind, dear," said his wife soothingly; "perhaps you'll win the next one."

Mr. White looked up sharply, just in time to intercept a knowing glance between mother and son. the words died away on his lips, and he hid a guilty grin in his thin grey beard.

"There he is," said Herbert White as the gate banged to loudly and heavy footsteps came toward the door.

The old man rose with hospitable haste and opening the door, was heard condoling with the new arrival. The new arrival also condoled with himself, so that Mrs. White said, "Tut, tut!" and coughed gently as her husband entered the room followed by a tall, burly man, beady of eye and rubicund of visage.

"Sargeant-Major Morris, " he said, introducing him.

The Sargeant-Major took hands and taking the proffered seat by the fire, watched contentedly as his host got out whiskey and tumblers and stood a small copper kettle on the fire.

At the third glass his eyes got brighter, and he began to talk, the little family circle regarding with eager interest this visitor from distant parts, as he squared his broad shoulders in the chair and spoke of wild scenes and dougty deeds; of wars and plagues and strange peoples.

"Twenty-one years of it," said Mr. White, nodding at his wife and son. "When he went away he was a slip of a youth in the warehouse. Now look at him."

"He don't look to have taken much harm." said Mrs. White politely.

"I'd like to go to India myself," said the old man, just to look around a bit, you know."

"Better where you are," said the Sargent-Major, shaking his head. He put down the empty glass and sighning softly, shook it again.

"I should like to see those old temples and fakirs and jugglers," said the old man. "what was that that you started telling me the other day about a monkey's paw or something, Morris?"

"Nothing." said the soldier hastily. "Leastways, nothing worth hearing."

"Monkey's paw?" said Mrs. White curiously.

"Well, it's just a bit of what you might call magic, perhaps." said the Sargeant-Major off-handedly.

His three listeners leaned forward eagerly. The visitor absent-mindedly put his empty glass to his lips and then set it down again. His host filled it for him again.

"To look at," said the Sargent-Major, fumbling in his pocket, "it's just an ordinary little paw, dried to a mummy."

He took something out of his pocket and proffered it. Mrs. White drew back with a grimace, but her son, taking it, examined it curiously.

"And what is there special about it?" inquired Mr. White as he took it from his son, and having examined it, placed it upon the table.

"It had a spell put on it by an old Fakir," said the Sargent-Major, "a very holy man. He wanted to show that fate ruled people's lifes, and that those who interefered with it did so to their sorrow. He put a spell on it so that three separate men could each have three wishes from it."

His manners were so impressive that his hearers were concious that their light laughter had jarred somewhat.

"Well, why don't you have three, sir?" said Herbert White cleverly.

The soldier regarded him the way that middle age is wont to regard presumptious youth."I have," he said quietly, and his blotchy face whitened.

"And did you really have the three wishes granted?" asked Mrs. White.

"I did," said the seargent-major, and his glass tapped against his strong teeth.

"And has anybody else wished?" persisted the old lady.

"The first man had his three wishes. Yes, " was the reply, "I don't know what the first two were, but the third was for death. That's how I got the paw."

His tones were so grave that a hush fell upon the group.

"If you've had your three wishes it's no good to you now then Morris," said the old man at last. "What do you keep it for?"

The soldier shook his head. "Fancy I suppose," he said slowly." I did have some idea of selling it, but I don't think I will. It has caused me enough mischief already. Besides, people won't buy. They think it's a fairy tale, some of them; and those who do think anything of it want to try it first and pay me afterward."

"If you could have another three wishes," said the old man, eyeing him keenly," would you have them?"

"I don't know," said the other. "I don't know."

He took the paw, and dangling it between his forefinger and thumb, suddenly threw it upon the fire. White, with a slight cry, stooped down and snatched it off.

"Better let it burn," said the soldier solemnly.

"If you don't want it Morris," said the other, "give it to me."

"I won't." said his friend doggedly. "I threw it on the fire. If you keep it, don't blame me for what happens. Pitch it on the fire like a sensible man."

The other shook his head and examined his possesion closely. "How do you do it?" he inquired.

"Hold it up in your right hand, and wish aloud," said the seargent-major, "But I warn you of the consequences."

"Sounds like the 'Arabian Nights'", said Mrs. White, as she rose and began to set the supper. "Don't you think you might wish for four pairs of hands for me."

Her husband drew the talisman from his pocket, and all three burst into laughter as the Seargent-Major, with a look of alarm on his face, caught him by the arm.

"If you must wish," he said gruffly, "Wish for something sensible."

Mr. White dropped it back in his pocket, and placing chairs, motioned his friend to the table. In the business of supper the talisman was partly forgotten, and afterward the three sat listening in an enthralled fashion to a second installment of the soldier's adventures in India.

"If the tale about the monkey's paw is not more truthful than those he has been telling us," said Herbert, as the door closed behind thier guest, just in time to catch the last train, "we shan't make much out of it."

"Did you give anything for it, father?" inquired Mrs. White, regarding her husband closely.

"A trifle," said he, colouring slightly, "He didn't want it, but I made him take it. And he pressed me again to throw it away."

"Likely," said Herbert, with pretended horror. "Why, we're going to be rich, and famous, and happy. Wish to be an emporer, father, to begin with; then you can't be henpecked."

He darted around the table, persued by the maligned Mrs White armed with an antimacassar.

Mr. White took the paw from his pocket and eyed it dubiously. "I don't know what to wish for, and that's a fact," he said slowly. It seems to me I've got all I want."

"If you only cleared the house, you'd be quite happy, wouldn't you!" said Herbert, with his hand on his shoulder. "Well, wish for two hundred pounds, then; that'll just do it."

His father, smiling shamefacedly at his own credulity, held up the talisman, as his son, with a solemn face, somewhat marred by a wink at his mother, sat down and struck a few impressive chords.

"I wish for two hundred pounds," said the old man distinctly.

A fine crash from the piano greeted his words, interupted by a shuddering cry from the old man. His wife and son ran toward him.

"It moved," he cried, with a glance of disgust at the object as it lay on the floor. "As I wished, it twisted in my hand like a snake."

"Well, I don't see the money," said his son, as he picked it up and placed it on the table, "and I bet I never shall."

"It must have been your fancy, father," said his wife, regarding him anxiously.

He shook his head. "Never mind, though; there's no harm done, but it gave me a shock all the same."

They sat down by the fire again while the two men finished thier pipes. Outside, the wind was higher than ever, an the old man started nervously at the sound of a door banging upstairs. A silence unusual and depressing settled on all three, which lasted until the old couple rose to retire for the rest of the night.

"I expect you'll find the cash tied up in a big bag in the middle of your bed," said Herbert, as he bade them goodnight, " and something horrible squatting on top of your wardrobe watching you as you pocket your ill-gotten gains."

He sat alone in the darkness, gazing at the dying fire, and seeing faces in it. The last was so horrible and so simian that he gazed at it in amazement. It got so vivid that, with a little uneasy laugh, he felt on the table for a glass containig a little water to throw over it. His hand grasped the monkey's paw, and with a little shiver he wiped his hand on his coat and went up to bed.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:01 pm

Part II

In the brightness of the wintry sun next morning as it streamed over the breakfast table he laughed at his fears. There was an air of prosaic wholesomeness about the room which it had lacked on the previous night, and the dirty, shriveled little paw was pitched on the side-board with a carelessness which betokened no great belief in its virtues.

"I suppose all old soldiers are the same," said Mrs White. "The idea of our listening to such nonsense! How could wishes be granted in these days? And if they could, how could two hundred pounds hurt you, father?"

"Might drop on his head from the sky," said the frivolous Herbert.

"Morris said the things happened so naturally," said his father, "that you might if you so wished attribute it to coincedence."

"Well don't break into the money before I come back," said Herbert as he rose from the table. "I'm afraid it'll turn you into a mean, avaricious man, and we shall have to disown you."

His mother laughed, and following him to the door, watched him down the road; and returning to the breakfast table, was very happy at the expense of her husband's credulity. All of which did not prevent her from scurrying to the door at the postman's knock, nor prevent her from referring somewhat shortly to retired Sargeant-Majors of bibulous habits when she found that the post brought a tailor's bill.

"Herbert will have some more of his funny remarks, I expect, when he comes home," she said as they sat at dinner.

"I dare say," said Mr. White, pouring himself out some beer; "but for all that, the thing moved in my hand; that I'll swear to."

"You thought it did," said the old lady soothingly.

"I say it did," replied the other. "There was no thought about it; I had just - What's the matter?"

His wife made no reply. She was watching the mysterious movements of a man outside, who, peering in an undecided fashion at the house, appeared to be trying to make up his mind to enter. In mental conexion with the two hundred pounds, she noticed that the stranger was well dressed, and wore a silk hat of glossy newness. Three times he paused at the gate, and then walked on again. The fourth time he stood with his hand upon it, and then with sudden resolution flung it open and walked up the path. Mrs White at the same moment placed her hands behind her, and hurriedly unfastening the strings of her apron, put that useful article of apparel beneath the cusion of her chair.

She brought the stranger, who seemed ill at ease, into the room. He gazed at her furtively, and listened in a preoccupied fashion as the old lady apologized for the appearance of the room, and her husband's coat, a garment which he usually reserved for the garden. She then waited as patiently as her sex would permit for him to broach his business, but he was at first strangely silent.

"I - was asked to call," he said at last, and stooped and picked a piece of cotton from his trousers. "I come from 'Maw and Meggins.' "

The old lady started. "Is anything the matter?" she asked breathlessly. "Has anything happened to Herbert? What is it? What is it?

Her husband interposed. "There there mother," he said hastily. "Sit down, and don't jump to conclusions. You've not brought bad news, I'm sure sir," and eyed the other wistfully.

"I'm sorry - " began the visitor.

"Is he hurt?" demanded the mother wildly.

The visitor bowed in assent."Badly hurt," he said quietly, "but he is not in any pain."

"Oh thank God!" said the old woman, clasping her hands. "Thank God for that! Thank - "

She broke off as the sinister meaning of the assurance dawned on her and she saw the awful confirmation of her fears in the others averted face. She caught her breath, and turning to her slower-witted husband, laid her trembling hand on his. There was a long silence.

"He was caught in the machinery," said the visitor at length in a low voice.

"Caught in the machinery," repeated Mr. White, in a dazed fashion,"yes."

He sat staring out the window, and taking his wife's hand between his own, pressed it as he had been wont to do in their old courting days nearly forty years before.

"He was the only one left to us," he said, turning gently to the visitor. "It is hard."

The other coughed, and rising, walked slowly to the window. " The firm wishes me to covey their sincere sympathy with you in your great loss," he said, without looking round. "I beg that you will understand I am only their servant and merely obeying orders."

There was no reply; the old womans face was white, her eyes staring, and her breath inaudible; on the husband's face was a look such as his freind the seargent might have carried into his first action.

"I was to say that Maw and Meggins disclaim all responsibility," continued the other. "They admit no liability at all, but in consideration of your son's services, they wish to present you with a certain sum as compensation."

Mr. White dropped his wife's hand, and rising to his feet, gazed with a look of horror at his visitor. His dry lips shaped the words, "How much?"

"Two hundred pounds," was the answer.

Unconcious of his wife's shriek, the old man smiled faintly, put out his hands like a sightless man, and dropped, a senseless heap, to the floor.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:01 pm

Part III

In the huge new cemetary, some two miles distant, the old people buried their dead, and came back to the house steeped in shadows and silence. It was all over so quickly that at first they could hardly realize it, and remained in a state of expectation as though of something else to happen - something else which was to lighten this load, too heavy for old hearts to bear.

But the days passed, and expectations gave way to resignation - the hopeless resignation of the old, sometimes mis-called apathy. Sometimes they hardly exchanged a word, for now they had nothing to talk about, and their days were long to weariness.

It was a about a week after that the old man, waking suddenly in the night, stretched out his hand and found himself alone. The room was in darkness, and the sound of subdued weeping came from the window. He raised himself in bed and listened.

"Come back," he said tenderly. "You will be cold."

"It is colder for my son," said the old woman, and wept afresh.

The sounds of her sobs died away on his ears. The bed was warm, and his eyes heavy with sleep. He dozed fitfully, and then slept until a sudden wild cry from his wife awoke him with a start.

"THE PAW!" she cried wildly. "THE MONKEY'S PAW!"

He started up in alarm. "Where? Where is it? Whats the matter?"

She came stumbling across the room toward him. "I want it," she said quietly. "You've not destroyed it?"

"It's in the parlour, on the bracket," he replied, marveling. "Why?"

She cried and laughed together, and bending over, kissed his cheek.

"I only just thought of it," she said hysterically. "Why didn't I think of it before? Why didn't you think of it?"

"Think of what?" he questioned.

"The other two wishes," she replied rapidly. "We've only had one."

"Was not that enough?" he demanded fiercely.

"No," she cried triumphantly; "We'll have one more. Go down and get it quickly, and wish our boy alive again."

The man sat in bed and flung the bedcloths from his quaking limbs."Good God, you are mad!" he cried aghast. "Get it," she panted; "get it quickly, and wish - Oh my boy, my boy!"

Her husband struck a match and lit the candle. "Get back to bed he said unsteadily. "You don't know what you are saying."

"We had the first wish granted," said the old woman, feverishly; "why not the second?"

"A coincidence," stammered the old man.

"Go get it and wish," cried his wife, quivering with exitement.

The old man turned and regarded her, and his voice shook. "He has been dead ten days, and besides he - I would not tell you else, but - I could only recognize him by his clothing. If he was too terrible for you to see then, how now?"

"Bring him back," cried the old woman, and dragged him towards the door. "Do you think I fear the child I have nursed?"

He went down in the darkness, and felt his way to the parlour, and then to the mantlepiece. The talisman was in its place, and a horrible fear that the unspoken wish might bring his mutillated son before him ere he could escape from the room seized up on him, and he caught his breath as he found that he had lost the direction of the door. His brow cold with sweat, he felt his way round the table, and groped along the wall until he found himself in the small passage with the unwholesome thing in his hand.

Even his wife's face seemed changed as he entered the room. It was white and expectant, and to his fears seemed to have an unnatural look upon it. He was afraid of her.

"WISH!" she cried in a strong voice.

"It is foolish and wicked," he faltered.

"WISH!" repeated his wife.

He raised his hand. "I wish my son alive again."

The talisman fell to the floor, and he regarded it fearfully. Then he sank trembling into a chair as the old woman, with burning eyes, walked to the window and raised the blind.

He sat until he was chilled with the cold, glancing ocasionally at the figure of the old woman peering through the window. The candle-end, which had burned below the rim of the china candlestick, was throwing pulsating shadows on the ceiling and walls, until with a flicker larger than the rest, it expired. The old man, with an unspeakable sense of relief at the failure of the talisman, crept back back to his bed, and a minute afterward the old woman came silently and apethetically beside him.

Neither spoke, but lat silently listening to the ticking of the clock. A stair creaked, and a squeaky mouse scurried noisily through the wall. The darkness was oppressive, and after lying for some time screwing up his courage, he took the box of matches, and striking one, went downstairs for a candle.

At the foot of the stairs the match went out, and he paused to strike another; and at the same moment a knock came so quiet and stealthy as to be scarcely audible, sounded on the front door.

The matches fell from his hand and spilled in the passage. He stood motionless, his breath suspended until the knock was repeated. Then he turned and fled swiftly back to his room, and closed the door behind him. A third knock sounded through the house.

"WHATS THAT?" cried the old woman, starting up.

"A rat," said the old man in shaking tones - "a rat. It passed me on the stairs."

His wife sat up in bed listening. A loud knock resounded through the house.

"It's Herbert!"

She ran to the door, but her husband was before her, and catching her by the arm, held her tightly.

"What are you going to do?" he whispered hoarsely.

"It's my boy; it's Herbert!" she cried, struggling mechanically. "I forgot it was two miles away. What are you holding me for? Let go. I must open the door."

"For God's sake don't let it in," cried the old man, trembling.

"You're afraid of your own son," she cried struggling. "Let me go. I'm coming, Herbert; I'm coming."

There was another knock, and another. The old woman with a sudden wrench broke free and ran from the room. Her husband follwed to the landing, and called after her appealingly as she hurried downstairs. He heard the chain rattle back and the bolt drawn slowly and stiffly from the socket. Then the old womans voice, strained and panting.

"The bolt," she cried loudly. "Come down. I can't reach it."

But her husband was on his hands and knees groping wildly on the floor in search of the paw. If only he could find it before the thing outside got in. A perfect fusillade of knocks reverberated throgh the house, and he heard the scraping of a chair as his wife as his wife put it down in the passage against the door. He heard the creaking of the bolt as it came slowly back, and at the same moment he found the monkeys's paw, and frantically breathed his third and last wish.

The knocking ceased suddenly, although the echoes of it were still in the house. He heard the chair drawn back, and the door opened. A cold wind rushed up the staircase, and a long loud wail of dissapointment and misery from his wife gave him the courage to run down to her side, and then to the gate beyond. The streetlamp flickering opposite shone on a quiet and deserted road.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:03 pm

"Khỉ" thật, truyện dài quá, em phải pốt thành 3 đoạn lận
Back to top Go down
View user profile
$had3
Adminxiteen
Adminxiteen


Tổng số bài gửi : 806
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Củ Chi

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:04 pm

tại vì truyện này lỗ thời quá

_________________
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://9ams.friendhood.net
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:15 pm

à ra thế đớ liên quan
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hellotoeveryone
Red Dragon
Red Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 811
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Westall Secondary College

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Mon Jun 15, 2009 7:29 pm

Các tềnh iêu dịch đi r` m` đọc :x...

Thế nhá :-*
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hellotoeveryone.deviantart.com
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:19 pm

lại phải dịch àh, nản
đây, thì dịch

Ngoài trời, đêm lạnh và ướt, nhưng trong biệt thự Lakesnam màn bỏ bốn bề, và lửa cháy sáng rực trong lò.

Hai cha con ông White đang say mê đánh cờ. Người cha thua hai bàn nên có hơi bực.

Bà vợ ngồi gần bên ôn tồn bảo:

- Ông đừng nóng, có thể bàn sau ông sẽ thắng.

Ông chồng vừa ngẩng đầu lên đúng lúc để nhìn thấy một cái nhìn đồng loã giữa hai mẹ con...

Ngay lúc đó có tiếng động cửa bên ngoài và có tiếng chân bước về phía cửa. Ông White đứng lên mở cửa. Chủ và khách chào hỏi nhau rồi bước vào trong.

Khách lạ là một người cao lớn vạm vỡ, mắt nhỏ và sáng, mặt đỏ gay. Ông tự giới thiệu:

- Trung sỹ Morris.

Khách bắt tay những người trong nhà rồi ngồi xuống bên cạnh lò sưởi trong khi chủ rót rượu mời khách.

Đến ly thứ ba, đôi mắt khách lạ bừng sáng và ông ta bắt đầu nói chuyện. Gia đình nhỏ bé của chủ nhà gồm có ba người, quây quần chung quanh để nghe ông khách lạ từ phương xa kể nhiều chuyện kỳ quái.

Ông White gật gù nói với bà vợ và cậu con:

- Hai mươi mốt năm qua, khi cậu này ra đi lưu lạc giang hồ, cậu chỉ là một thiếu niên giúp việc trong kho hàng của mình. Bây giờ nhìn xem, cậu đã trưởng thành tốt đẹp!

Bà vợ góp ý:

- Cậu Morris có vẻ nhàn lắm.

Ông chồng:

- Tôi cũng muốn đi chu du thiên hạ, muốn ghé qua ấn Độ để cho biết với người ta.

Trung sỹ lắc đầu, bảo:

- Tôi nghĩ rằng ai ở đâu nên ở đó là tốt hơn hết.

Rồi đặt ly rượu xuống, ông khẽ thở dài rồi lại lắc đầu.

Ông White vẫn tiếp tục nói lên ý nghĩ của ông:

- Tôi muốn thấy những đền đài cổ, những ông phù thủy và những tay thuật sỹ. À, hôm trước cậu có nói sơ qua về câu chuyện bàn tay khỉ, cậu có thể kể thêm cho chúng tôi nghe không?

Trung sỹ vội gạt ngang:

- Thôi bỏ qua đi. Chuyện đó không đáng nói. Toàn nhảm nhí.

Nhưng bà White tò mò hỏi:

- Chuyện bàn tay khỉ? Chuyện đó ra sao?

Trung sỹ giải thích sơ qua:

- Đó là một câu chuyện có thể gọi là huyền bí.

Ba thính giả chồm tới lắng nghe. Ông khách mơ màng nốc cạn ly rượu rồi đặt xuống bàn. Ông White châm rượu vào ly.

Trung sỹ mò trong túi áo lấy một vật, đưa ra:

- Đây, bàn tay khỉ đây!

Nó cũng chẳng có gì lạ. Người ta đã phơi khô nó tự bao giờ.

Bà White ngả người ra sau, le lưỡi. Nhưng cậu con ngắm nghía cẩn thận. Ông White hỏi:

- Cái này có gì đặc biệt không?

Trung sỹ Morris tiếp tục nói:

- Bàn tay khỉ này có một phép màu do một vị phù thuỷ đại tài ban cho nó. Vị phù thuỷ này muốn chứng tỏ là con người ở đời ai cũng có số mệnh, và kẻ nào toan cải đổi số mệnh sẽ bị tai nạn buồn phiền. Bàn tay khỉ này có phép màu. Ba người ở đây có thể xin mỗi người một điều ước.

Thái độ của khách lạ rất trịnh trọng nên thính giả không cười nữa.

Cậu Herbert hỏi:

- Tại sao ông không xin ba điều ước đó?

Trung sỹ nhìn cậu thanh niên với đôi mắt của kẻ lớn tuổi dành cho kẻ hậu sinh. Rồi ôn tồn đáp, gương mặt tái hẳn:

- Tôi đã có xin rồi!

Rồi nâng ly rượu lên nốc cạn. Bà White hỏi thêm:

- Còn có ai khác xin nữa không?

Trung sỹ đáp:

- Người đầu tiên được cả ba điều ước. Tôi không rõ hai điều trước là gì. Nhưng điều thứ ba là chết. Nhờ người đó chết nên tôi mới có vật này.

Giọng nói của ông ta rất trầm buồn, nghiêm nghị thành thử mọi người trở nên im lặng.

Ông White nói:

- Nếu cậu đã được ba điều ước rồi thì vật này không còn giá trị đối với cậu nữa. Tại sao cậu lại giữ nó để làm gì?

Trung sỹ lắc đầu:

- Tôi có ý định bán nó, nhưng nghĩ lại tôi không muốn. Vì nó đã gây tai nạn cho biết bao người rồi. Vả lại không ai mua đâu, không ai tin chuyện tôi nói. Họ nghĩ thời buổi này làm gì có những chuyện hoang đường như thế. Vài người đòi thử trước rồi mới trả tiền sau.

Ông White lại hỏi:

- Nếu cậu được phép xin thêm ba điều khác, cậu có muốn không?

Trung sỹ lắc đầu:

- Tôi không biết, tôi không nghĩ tới vấn đề đó.

Y cầm bàn tay khỉ lên xoay qua xoay lại giữa mấy ngón tay rồi bỗng ném nó vào lửa.

Ông White kêu lên một tiếng, cúi xuống kéo nó ra thật nhanh.

Trung sỹ trịnh trọng:

- Nên đốt nó đi là hơn.

Ông White lắc đầu:

- Nếu cậu không muốn giữ nó thì cậu cho tôi.

Trung sỹ lắc đầu:

- Không được. Tôi ném vào lửa. Nếu ông tiếc mà giữ nó lại thì có chuyện gì xảy ra, ông đừng phiền tôi. Ông nên ném vào lửa đi cho được việc.

Ông White lắc đầu, chăm chú ngắm vật mà ông vừa làm chủ. Một lúc sau ông hỏi:

- Muốn ước, phải làm thế nào?

Trung sỹ:

- Nắm vật này trong tay mặt và lớn tiếng nói rõ những điều ước. Nhưng tôi khuyên ông hãy suy nghĩ cẩn thận lại. Nên thấy rõ những hậu quả của hành động của ông.

Bà White kêu lên:

- Giống như chuyện Ả Rập "Ngàn lẻ một đêm".

Bà đứng lên lo buổi ăn tối, nói đùa:

- Đâu, ông ước cho tôi có bốn tay để làm công việc nhà nhanh :Dng.

Ông chồng lấy bảo vật trong túi ra, và cả ba người trong gia đình bật cười khi trung sỹ hốt hoảng nắm tay ông lại, dặn dò thêm:

- Nếu ông cương quyết xin ba điều ước thì nên xin sao cho hợp lý.

Ông White bỏ lại vật vào trong túi, kéo ghế mời trung sỹ ngồi xuống bàn.

Trong khi ăn, người ta quên câu chuyện bùa chú, nhưng sau lúc ăn cả ba người ngồi quây quần bên anh quân nhân để nghe chuyện kỳ thú ở ấn Độ.

Ông khách cáo từ, Herbert tiễn ông ra cửa rồi quay vào ngay nói với cha mẹ cậu:

- Nếu câu chuyện huyền hoặc về cái bàn tay khỉ là chuyện bịa đặt cũng như các câu chuyện phiêu lưu mạo hiểm mà ông ta vừa kể cho mình nghe thì mình có bảo vật đó cũng chẳng ích gì.

Bà White nhìn chồng chăm chú rồi hỏi:

- Ông có trả cho cậu đó chút :Dnh gì không?

Ông chồng:

- Của chả đáng gì. Cậu ta không thèm nữa, ném vào lửa. Tôi lượm mót, cậu ta lại khuyên tôi vứt đi.

Cậu Herbert vẻ tin tưởng:

- Đâu mình thử ước xem. Nếu linh ứng thì gia đình mình sẽ giàu có, tên tuổi, hạnh phúc. Ba hãy ước được làm vua. Và trước khi làm vua, ba sẽ không... thờ bà.

Nói xong cậu chạy quanh bàn ăn vì mẹ cậu đuổi theo toan "ký" vào đầu cậu về câu nói phạm thượng đó.

Ông White lại móc túi lấy bùa ra, nhìn nó với vẻ bán tín bán nghi, lẩm bẩm:

- Tôi chưa biết phải ước gì đây? Kể ra thì đời tôi đầy đủ, chẳng thiếu thứ gì.

Cậu con đến bên cạnh cha, nói:

- Bây giờ nếu có thêm một ít tiền xài chơi chắc ba thích lắm. Vậy ba nên ước có hai trăm bạc.

Người cha cười dễ dãi, như tự tha thứ tánh dễ tin của mình rồi cầm bàn tay khỉ đưa lên cao, vẻ trịnh trọng. Ông nheo mắt về phía bà vợ đang ngồi sau chiếc dương cầm. Bà đánh lên mấy nốt nhạc thật mạnh.

Ông chồng dõng dạc nói to lên:

- Tôi muốn có hai trăm bạc.

Bà White đánh thêm mấy nốt nhạc như để phụ hoạ với lời ước ao của chồng.

Nhưng liền sau đó ông White kêu lên:

- Ý trời đất ơi! Nó nhúc nhích!

Vừa lạ, ông vừa nhìn cái bàn tay khỉ đang cử động trên sàn. Ông nói tiếp:

- Khi nãy tôi có ước là trông thấy bàn tay này nhúc nhích trong bàn tay tôi như một con rắn. Rõ ràng là điều tôi ước đã được ứng nghiệm.

Cậu con cầm bàn tay khỉ lên, đặt trên bàn, nói:

- Nhưng con chưa thấy có tiền, và con cam đoan là số tiền đó sẽ không bao giờ đến với ta.

Bà vợ hoang mang bảo chồng:

- Ông ước chuyện không hay!

Ông chồng lắc đầu:

- Chỉ là trò đùa thôi. Bà đừng thắc mắc. Dù sao chuyện này cũng làm cho tôi kinh sợ.

Cả gia đình ngồi bên lò sưởi. Hai cha con ông White ngồi hút ống điếu.

Bên ngoài gió gào dữ dội hơn bao giờ hết, cánh cửa trên lầu bị gió đập kêu rầm rầm, tiếng động đó khiến ông White lo sợ không đâu.

Bầu không khí lạ thường bao trùm gia đình cho đến khi họ đi ngủ.

Cậu Herbert nói:

- Con hy vọng ba sẽ nhận được số tiền hai trăm bạc mà ba ước trong một túi lớn đặt trên giường của ba và sẽ có một cái gì ghê gớm ngồi trên nóc tủ chứng kiến lúc ba nhận số tiền đó.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:20 pm

Sáng hôm sau trời trong sáng, Herbert mỉm cười trước những điều lo sợ hoang đường trong đêm. Bàn tay khỉ bỏ lăn lóc trên mặt bàn trong phòng. Điều này cho thấy là báu vật lúc này không được người ta tín nhiệm, tưng tiu như trong đêm.
Bà White nói:

- Tôi nghĩ ông quân nhân nào cũng vậy. Họ mê tín dị đoan lắm. Vậy mà chúng mình cũng chịu khó lắng nghe. Thật là vô lý. Vào thời buổi này làm gì có những chuyện ước nguyện như vậy! Và nếu như chuyện này có thật thì số bạc hai trăm đến tay ông bằng cách nào?

Cậu Herbert xen vào:

- Chắc là từ trên trời rơi xuống!

Ông White nói:

- Cậu Morris quả quyết là các điều ước ứng nghiệm một cách tự nhiên khiến người ta nghĩ đó là sự ngẫu nhiên.

Sau khi ăn xong, Herbert đứng lên:

- Nếu có tiền thật thì ba hãy giữ nguyên trước khi con về. Con chỉ sợ số bạc đó sẽ biến ba thành một người hà tiện và má với con phải giữ số tiền đó cho ba.

Bà mẹ cười trước câu nói đùa của con. Bà theo Herbert ra cửa rồi quay trở về bàn ăn. Bà có vẻ vui tươi trước thái độ dễ tin của ông chồng.

Dù vậy khi nghe người phát thư gõ cửa, bà cũng chạy nhanh ra hy vọng có tiền. Nhưng bà chỉ nhận được giấy đòi tiền Herbert may quần áo của ông thợ may.

Đến bữa ăn chiều, vẫn không có gì mới lạ. Bà mẹ lẩm bẩm:

- Chốc nữa đây thằng Herbert về, nó sẽ chế nhạo ông nhiều nữa cho mà coi!

Ông White rót bia vào ly nói:

- Có một chuyện lạ là bàn tay khỉ cử động khi tôi nắm nó trong tay.

Bà vợ cười:

- Đó là tại ông giàu óc tưởng tượng.

Ông chồng nhấn mạnh:

- Tôi không nghĩ mà tôi biết rõ ràng nó cử động...

Bà vợ không đáp, bà đang nhìn một người bên ngoài đang có những cử chỉ khác thường. Ông này nhìn đăm đăm vào nhà, nhưng do dự nửa muốn vào nửa muốn không.

Bà White thấy kẻ lạ ăn mặc đàng hoàn, đầu đội nón thật mới. Ba lần y đứng lại trước cổng rồi tiếp tục đi. Đến lần thứ tư y đứng lại, đặt tay lên cổng rồi bỗng nhiên cương quyết đẩy cửa cổng bước vào con đường đưa tới trước cửa nhà.

Bà White vội vàng cởi khăn choàng trước ngực giấu dưới nệm.

Bà đưa khách lạ vào phòng. Ông này có vẻ không được tự nhiên. Ông thường nhìn trộm bà và lơ đãng nghe bà giải thích vì sao phòng khách không được ngăn nắp như thường ngày.

Bà White không dám hỏi ngay lý do cuộc viếng thăm của khách lạ. Sau cùng ông khách mới nói:

- Thưa bà, tôi được người ta nhờ đến đây để...

Khách im lặng một lúc rồi tiếp:

- Tôi từ Maw và Meggins tới đây.

Bà White giật mình, hổn hển nói:

- Có việc gì không? Herbert có chuyện gì?

Ông chồng xen vào:

- Bà nên bình tĩnh. Mời ông ngồi. Chúng ta nên thong thả. Tôi nghĩ ông không mang tin dữ đến cho chúng tôi, phải vậy không?

Vừa nói ông vừa nháy mắt với khách lạ.

Ông khách ấp úng:

- Tôi rất tiếc...

Bà White vẫn không an tâm:

- Con tôi bị thương?

Khách lạ gật đầu, ôn tồn nói:

- Dạ phải, cậu Herbert bị thương nặng. Nhưng cậu cảm thấy không đau đớn gì hết!

Bà mẹ chắp hai tay lại kêu lên:

- Cám ơn Chúa đã giúp con tôi. Chúa đã...

Bà chưa dứt lời, bỗng thấy khuôn mặt buồn thảm của khách lạ, bà bấm bàn tay chồng để giữ bình tĩnh.

Im lặng một lúc thật lâu, khách lạ nói thật nhỏ:

- Cậu Herbert bị kẹt trong guồng máy!

Ông White lặp lại câu đó như một tiếng vang:

- Kẹt trong guồng máy!

Rồi ông nhìn ra ngoài cửa sổ, siết chặt bàn tay vợ.

Ông nói với khách lạ, giọng thật buồn:

- Herbert là đứa con duy nhất còn lại của chúng tôi. Nó chết rồi, chúng tôi thật là bơ vơ.

Khách lạ ho mấy tiếng, đứng lên từ từ bước về phía cửa sổ. Ông nói:

- Công ty phái tôi đến để tỏ lời phân ưu với ông bà về tai nạn đáng tiếc vừa qua.

Khách nói một hơi không nhìn đôi vợ chồng già, tiếp tục:

- Tôi chỉ là nhân viên của công ty, xin ông bà hiểu cho tình thế của tôi.

Không ai trả lời. Gương mặt bà vợ tái xanh, đứng tròng và hơi thở của bà chỉ còn thoi thóp. Còn ông thì có vẻ xa vắng.

Khách lạ nói tiếp:

- Công ty Maw và Meggins không nhận trách nhiệm trong tai nạn này. Nhưng vì cậu Herbert đã giúp việc lâu năm cho công ty nên công ty quyết định gửi đến cho ông bà món tiền gọi là...

Ông White buông bàn tay của bà vợ mà ông đang nắm, nhìn khách lạ với đôi mắt đầy kinh hãi:

- Bao nhiêu?

- Hai trăm bạc.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:20 pm

Trong nghĩa địa mới lập, rộng thênh thang, cách nhà độ hơn dặm, hai vợ chồng già chôn cất đứa con duy nhất. Họ trở về nhà sống âm thầm như hai chiếc bóng.
Chuyện xảy ra quá nhanh :Dng khiến họ ý thức được tầm quan trọng của vấn đề. Họ vẫn ở trong tình trạng chờ đợi, hy vọng một cái gì xảy ra để cho họ nhẹ bớt được phần nào gánh nặng sầu đau, quá nặng đối với hai vợ chồng già.

Nhưng ngày lại ngày thấm thoát qua và niềm hy vọng mơ hồ của họ trở thành tuyệt vọng.

Họ sống âm thầm. Cả ngày không trao đổi với nhau một lời, vì họ chẳng còn gì để nói. Cho nên ngày tháng đối với họ thật dài, dài không chịu nổi.

Một tuần sau, ông White giật mình thức giấc vào lúc nửa đêm. Ông dang cánh tay ra và chỉ thấy một mình trên giường.

Gian phòng tối đen, chỉ có tiếng khóc nghẹn ngào bên cửa sổ. Ông ngồi dậy, lắng nghe một lúc rồi bảo:

- Bà ơi! Bà vào đây, ở đó coi chừng trúng sương, trúng gió.

Bà vợ khóc òa lên:

- Nhưng con tôi còn lạnh hơn tôi nhiều!

Ông chồng vẫn còn mê ngủ, ông nằm xuống chiếc giường ấm êm, nhắm mắt lại.
Ông đang mơ màng thì nghe tiếng bà vợ hét lên thật hãi hùng. Ông lồm cồm bò dậy thì nghe tiếng bà vợ la tiếp:

- Cái bàn tay khỉ! Cái bàn tay khỉ!

Ông chồng hỏi:

- Ở đâu? Để làm gì?

Bà vợ thất thểu tiến về phía ông nói:

- Tôi muốn thấy cái bàn tay khỉ! Ông đã thiêu hủy nó chưa?

- Chưa. Tôi để nó ở ngoài phòng khách, trên giá đàn. Nhưng để làm gì?

- Mình mới chỉ ước có một điều, còn hai điều nữa.

Ông chồng kêu lên giận dữ:

- Trời ơi! Bấy nhiêu đó còn chưa đủ sao?

Bà vợ cũng to tiếng không kém:

- Chưa! Tôi còn có thể ước thêm một điều nữa. Ông xuống dưới lấy lên đây. Nhanh, nghe không? Và ước cho thằng Herbert sống lại.

Ông White ngồi dậy, vứt mền sang một bên, hoảng hốt:

- Trời đất! Bà có điên không?

Nhưng bà vợ vẫn cương quyết:

- Ông đi lấy ngay đi. Và ước cho thằng Herbert sống lại.

Ông chồng quẹt lửa thắp ngọn nến, bảo:

- Bà nên đi ngủ đi, bà không biết bà đang nói gì.

Bà vợ vẫn không chịu thua:

- Chúng ta đã có điều ước thứ nhất, tại sao lại không có điều ước thứ hai?

Ông chồng lẩm bẩm:

- Đó là một sự ngẫu nhiên.

Bà cụ ré lên:

- Ông có đi nhanh không! Và ước y như tôi nói.

Ông chồng đành đi xuống lầu trong đêm tối, mò mẫm vào phòng khách. Đến bên lò sưởi ông thấy bảo vật vẫn nằm ở chỗ cũ. Một sự lo sợ xâm chiếm lấy hồn ông. Ông sợ ước cậu con sống lại, cậu sẽ bị tật nguyền suốt đời. Với sự lo sợ đó ông toát mồ hôi, lò mò mãi mà không trở lên lầu được.

Nét mặt của bà vợ đổi sắc khi ông White bước vào phòng ngủ. Ông cảm thấy sợ cả bà vợ của ông.

Bà vợ kêu lên:

- Ước đi!

Ông ấp úng nhưng bà vợ lại quát:

- Ước đi!

Ông White nắm tay đưa lên:

- Tôi ước con tôi sống lại!

Cái bàn tay khỉ rơi xuống sàn. Ông thấy nó nhúc nhích.

Hai vợ chồng già chăm chú nhìn bảo vật một lúc, tâm trí như đặt hết tin tưởng vào phép lạ. Một lúc sau bà vợ tiến đến bên cửa sổ, vén màn lên. Bà đứng đó, nhìn ra ngoài chờ đợi cậu Herrbert sống dậy trở về.

Ông chồng ngồi bất động trên ghế. Ông cảm thấy khí lạnh thấm vào cơ thể, nhưng vẫn ngồi yên, thỉnh thoảng liếc về phía bà vợ đang nhìn lom lom ra phía ngoài đường.

Ngọn nến đã tàn, ném những mảnh ánh sáng chập chờn lên trần, lên tường. Cuối cùng, khi tim nến đã lụi, đốm lửa bỗng loé lên lần :Dt rồi phụt tắt. Ông White thấy nhẹ người khi bảo vật không đem lại lời ước thứ hai của ông. Ông trở về giường nằm. Một hai phút sau bà cụ cũng đến ngồi bên ông.

Không ai nói với ai lời nào, cả hai nằm trong tiếng tích tắc của đồng hồ. Trong sự yên lặng của đêm, dường như có tiếng răng rắc xuất phát từ thang lầu, tiếng chuột chạy sát chân tường. Bóng tối như đè lên người khiến ông cụ ngột ngạt, khó chịu. Sau khi nằm ráng một chút để lấy can đảm, ông cụ lấy hộp quẹt, bật lửa lên, đi xuống lầu để tìm một cây nến khác.

Đúng vào lúc đó có tiếng gõ cửa thật nhẹ, lén lút cho nên tiếng động rất nhỏ, gần như đủ lớn để cho người nghe thấy.

Hộp quẹt rơi khỏi bàn tay ông White. Ông đến chết sững, hơi thở của ông ngưng lại cho đến khi tiếng gõ cửa lại vang lên lần nữa. Bấy giờ ông mới quay lưng lại để chạy về phòng ngủ, đóng cửa thật nhanh.

Một tiếng gõ cửa thứ ba vang động khắp nhà. Bà cụ giật mình kêu lên:

- Cái gì vậy?

Ông chồng run run đáp:

- Chuột, một con chuột chạy lên thang lầu, suýt dẫm lên chân tôi.

Bà cụ ngồi trên giường lắng nghe. Lại một tiếng động vang lên khắp nhà. Bà kêu lên:

- Herbert về! Chính Herbert về.

Bà chạy về phía cửa, nhưng chồng bà đã tới trước bà. Ông nắm tay níu bà lại, hỏi:

- Bà định làm gì?

Bà cụ kêu lên:

- Herbert về! Nó là con tôi. Ông phải để tôi mở cửa cho nó vào. Buông tôi ra!

Ông cụ run rẩy, van nài:

- Không! Bà không nên cho nó vào!

Bà cụ bất bình:

- Coi kìa! Ông sợ cả con ông nữa sao? Hãy buông tôi ra. Để tôi mở cửa cho nó vào.

Rồi bà nói to:

- Má đây! Herbert, chờ má một chút!

Lại thêm một tiếng, rồi hai tiếng gõ cửa. Bà vợ vùng khỏi tay chồng, chạy ra khỏi phòng. Ông chồng theo bà tới cầu thàng, dang tay bất lực gọi với theo, nhưng bà lao xuống đến tầng dưới.

Ông nghe tiếng mở khoá và tút chốt thật khó khăn. Thế rồi tiếng bà vợ hổn hển kêu to:

- Còn cái chốt! Ông mau xuống mở giùm đi!

Trên lầu, ông chồng đang quỳ xuống sàn mò kiếm cái bàn tay khi. Ông cố kiếm được nó trước khi kẻ gây ra tiếng gõ cửa bước vào nhà.

Trong khi đó tiếng gõ cửa vang dội liên tiếp như một loạt súng. Ông nghe tiếng kéo ghế mà bà vợ đặt ngay trước cửa. Ông nghe tiếng chốt cửa khua lên. Cũng trong lúc đó ông tìm được cái bàn tay khỉ.

Hổn hển, ông nắm nó vào bàn tay, đưa lên cao nói lên lời ước thứ ba và cũng là lời ước cuối cùng.

Đột nhiên tiếng gõ cửa ngưng ngay tức khắc, mặc dầu những tiếng động trước đó vẫn còn vọng dội vào trong nhà. Cùng lúc ông nghe tiếng ghế kéo ở phía cửa và cánh cửa mở toang. Gió lạnh lùa vào, thổi tạt lên tận cầu thang...

Tiếng rên đầy đau đớn thất vọng của bà vợ khiến ông White có thêm can đảm để chạy xuống bên cạnh bà. Rồi như còn quán tính, ông chạy thẳng ra cổng bên ngoài. Ngọn đèn đường lù mù đối diện với ngôi nhà toả ánh sáng yếu ớt xuống con đường im vắng, không một bóng người... ./.
Hết .
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hellotoeveryone
Red Dragon
Red Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 811
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Westall Secondary College

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:24 pm

Dài quá, chưa đọc hết =.="

Sao ko làm 1 cái Summary trc' cho ng` ta 8-|

Thế nhá
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hellotoeveryone.deviantart.com
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:24 pm

ùi dào ơi, lười lắm, đọc thì đọc, không đọc thì thôi
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hellotoeveryone
Red Dragon
Red Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 811
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Westall Secondary College

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:25 pm

Đã có lòng hảo tâm ngồi dịch mà lại lười viết cái summary àh 8-|
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hellotoeveryone.deviantart.com
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:27 pm

nói thế thôi, summary xong mất hay. Truyện đọc từng chữ một mới thất có ý nghĩa ;
Back to top Go down
View user profile
do_quangminh
Diamond hole
Diamond hole


Tổng số bài gửi : 436
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:27 pm

Tôi chả hiểu jì cả. Thế thì câu truyện kết thúc à???
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:28 pm

...
ông không hiểu thật àh
ông đọc phần tiếng Việt đấy hả?
tôi có dịch nhầm không kà?
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hellotoeveryone
Red Dragon
Red Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 811
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Westall Secondary College

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:30 pm

Cái tay khỉ khô này đc 1 lần nhắc đến trong xxxHolic x"D....

Lôi đâu ra truyện này thế?
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hellotoeveryone.deviantart.com
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 12:31 pm

cái này áh? đọc hồi 3 tuổi ở bên San Fran. trong thư viện trường
Back to top Go down
View user profile
do_quangminh
Diamond hole
Diamond hole


Tổng số bài gửi : 436
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:15 pm

Ờ. truyện thì tôi hiểu rồi, nhưng nó có liên quan cái quái jì tới cái mặt dây hình con khỉ thế???
Ô định ước cái jì àh?? 3 điều cơ đấy.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
kin K
Red ruby hole
Red ruby hole


Tổng số bài gửi : 362
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 3:24 pm

ôi dào :-j truyện này có trong cuốn "Dị Truyện" của tôi, dịch ra là tryện "Bàn tay khỉ" , mấy lị có lần tôi cũng định post, nhưng mờ sợ dài quá mọi ng ko thèm đọc

các bạn mà có muốn đọc ấy, tớ mang cả quyển đi cho :x

hoặc là hôm nào tớ post cho truyện khác cũng hay...

gọi là cái gì "Hoang mạc Châu Phi" hay sao ấy :-??

nhưng nói chung tớ thì tớ thích mấy truyện trong ấy cực :x :x :x

_________________


Đừng bôi

ĐỒ CON LỢN
ĐÃ BẢO K BÔI RỒI MÀ CÒN CỐ TÌNH =)


dù thế nào đi chăng nữa :-ss
Back to top Go down
View user profile
RaldHellscream
Blue Dragon
Blue Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 546
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Đâu chả đc

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 8:27 pm

chả hiểu khỉ khô gì cả :-b ở trên forum mà post truyện dài thì chả ai có đủ can đảm mà đọc hết ko
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Hellotoeveryone
Red Dragon
Red Dragon


Tổng số bài gửi : 811
Join date : 2009-06-08
Đến từ : Westall Secondary College

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 9:24 pm

Nói chung là ước gì thì sau này cũng sẽ phải trả giá :-j

Chả ham :-j
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hellotoeveryone.deviantart.com
sylvia_king
Rìu chiến bạc chấm
Rìu chiến bạc chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 170
Join date : 2009-06-15

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:31 pm

Save this for the weekend :) Guess I'll find out soon
Tren forum lop n` thu hay ho qua, minh sign up muon qua
Back to top Go down
View user profile
vuha94
Rìu chiến chấm
Rìu chiến chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 121
Join date : 2009-06-10

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Wed Jun 17, 2009 11:39 am

RaldHellscream wrote:
chả hiểu khỉ khô gì cả :-b ở trên forum mà post truyện dài thì chả ai có đủ can đảm mà đọc hết ko
Ừm, "chả ai có đủ can đảm mà đọc hết ko " nghĩa là gì hả bạn Hương?

sylvia_king wrote:
Save this for the weekend :) Guess I'll find out soon. Tren forum lop n` thu hay ho qua, minh sign up muon qua
Cụ ơi pốt forest gump đi cụ

do_quangminh wrote:
Ờ. truyện thì tôi hiểu rồi, nhưng nó có liên quan cái quái jì tới cái mặt dây hình con khỉ thế??? Ô định ước cái jì àh?? 3 điều cơ đấy.
Ừhm, this is a secret for me to keep, and for you to find out

kin K wrote:
các bạn mà có muốn đọc ấy, tớ mang cả quyển đi cho :x
hay thế, cho tôi mượn đi ;
Back to top Go down
View user profile
sylvia_king
Rìu chiến bạc chấm
Rìu chiến bạc chấm


Tổng số bài gửi : 170
Join date : 2009-06-15

PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Wed Jun 17, 2009 4:01 pm

Thua chau, file prc post len day bang cai j bay h?
Co khi luc nao cu lam 1 muc gioi thieu truyen, gioi thieu may truyen lien 1 luc vay.

Thu hai la, RaldHellscream la Do Anh Duc chu Hg nao o day? Hay Duc vua doi ten a? Do Thi Dieu Huong???
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?   Today at 6:54 pm

Back to top Go down
 
The Monkey's Paw ... Mọi người hiểu vì sao em đeo cái mặt dây có con khỉ rồi chớ?
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 2Go to page : 1, 2  Next
 Similar topics
-
» Brit woman savaged by monkey
» Monkey cookie cutter
» Fifty Shades of Grey

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: Truyện-
Jump to: